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Thread: Total War: Shogun 2 quotes

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    Junior Member Private Pavelas's Avatar
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    Default Total War: Shogun 2 quotes

    Hello, everybody!
    I'm not big fan of strategy games and TW: Shogun 2, but I was amazed(and still I'm) by huge number of quotes, so I decided to "hunt" them and post here! Enjoy!

    Do not think you will necessarily be aware of your own enlightenment.


    It is said that the inferior seek to emulate the superior. Thus, if a general slackens only a little, those beneath him will be greatly negligent.

    The colour of the mountains is Buddha's body; the sound of running water is his great speech.

    Confront them with annihilation, and they will then survive; plunge them into a deadly situation, and they will then live. When people fall into danger, they are then able to strive for victory.

    The clever hawk hides its claws.

    A general of great merit should be said to be a man who has met with at least one great defeat.

    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting.

    A flower falls, even though we love it; and a weed grows, even though we do not love it.

    The enlightened ruler is heedful, and the good general full of caution.

    Even if one has learned all the sayings of the sages and saints, he should not insist on them obstinately.

    A little piece of gold may be highly valued, but if it gets in one's eye, the result will be darkness.

    Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.

    All warfare is based on deception.

    Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.

    The stake that sticks out gets hammered down.

    If you do not enter the tiger's cave, you will not catch its cub.

    Dishonour is like a scar on a tree, which time, instead of effacing, only helps to enlarge.

    The foot feels the foot when it feels the ground.

    Nothing ever exists entirely alone; everything is in relation to everything else.

    The expert in battle seeks his victory from strategic advantage and does not demand it from his men.

    If you know your enemy and know yourself, you will not be imperilled by a hundred battles. If you do not know the others but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one. If you do not know the enemy and do not know yourselves you will be in danger in every battle.

    The way of the warrior is death. This means choosing death whenever there is a choice between life and death. It means nothing else.

    To perceive victory when it is known to all is not really skilful… It does not take much strength to lift a hair, it does not take sharp eyes to see the sun and moon, it does not take sharp ears to hear the thunderclap.

    A man must not live under the same sky as one who has injured his lord or father.

    One kind word can warm three winter months.

    The skilful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man.

    When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce.

    Beginning is easy - Continuing is hard.

    Opportunities multiply as they are seized.

    One should not be envious of someone who has prospered by unjust deeds. Nor should he disdain someone who has fallen while adhering to the path of righteousness.

    You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.

    It is essential to seek out enemy agents who have come to conduct espionage against you and to bribe them to serve you. Give them instructions and care for them. Thus double agents are recruited and used.

    Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.

    It is only the enlightened ruler and the wise general who will use the highest intelligence of the army for the purposes of spying, and thereby they achieve great results.

    Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely.

    To fight and conquer in all our battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting.

    Death refuses to wait for the space of a breath; life is more evanescent than a mayfly or a lightning flash.

    One should have insight into this world of dreams that passes in the twinkling of an eye.

    What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease.

    If our soldiers are not overburdened with money, it is not because they have a distaste for riches; if their lives are not unduly long, it is not because they are disinclined to longevity.

    Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.

    The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.

    If a man does not investigate into the matter of bushido daily, it will be difficult for him to die a brave and manly death.

    žHence that general is skilful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skilful in defence whose opponent does not know what to attack.

    Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.

    He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks.

    The opportunity to secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.

    When torrential water ****es boulders, it is because of its momentum. When the strike of a hawk breaks the body of its prey, it is because of timing.

    As for the decorum at the time of a campaign, one must be mindful that he is a samurai. A person who loves beautification where it is unnecessary is fit for punishment.

    To a surrounded enemy, you must leave a way of escape.

    He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces.

    He who is prudent, and lies in wait for an enemy who is not, will be victorious.

    Encourage and listen well to the words of your subordinates. It is well known that gold lies hidden underground.

    You should not have a favourite weapon. To become over-familiar with one weapon is as much a fault as not knowing it sufficiently well.

    When delivering something like an important letter or other written materials, grasp it firmly in your hand as you go and do not release it once, but hand it over directly to the recipient.

    Dripping morning dew; mimics the blood from a blade; it does not wake me.

    People in this world look at things mistakenly, and think that what they do not understand must be the void. This is not the true void. It is bewilderment.

    By inconsistency and frivolity we stray from the Way and show ourselves to be beginners. In this we do much harm.

    Learning is to a man as the leaves and branches are to a tree, and it can be said that he should simply not be without it.

    The crane soars higher; its wings brush cherry blossom; my soul flies with it.

    Also by training you will be able to freely control your own body, conquer men with your body, and with sufficient training you will be able to beat ten men with your spirit. When you have reached this point, will it not mean that you are invincible?

    Men with discrimination will be viewed as schemers; second, men with deep far-sightedness will be seen as cowards; and third, men with rough behaviour will be mistaken for real warriors.

    When all your judgements are based on your own wisdom, you tend towards selfishness and fail by straying from the right path.

    It is better not to become acquainted with men about whom you have formerly had doubts. No matter what you do, they will be people by whom you will be tripped up or taken in.

    In the ponds cool depths; the happy frog plays in spring; his life, a slow game.

    Heat haze of summer; obscures a man’s path ahead; an unclear future.

    The saying 'the arts aid the body' is for samurai of other regions. For samurai of the Nabeshima clan the arts bring ruin to the body.

    In the void is virtue, and no evil. Wisdom has existence, principle has existence, the way has existence, spirit is nothingness.

    The death of blossoms; is not something to grieve on; but the way of things.

    If there is a Way involving the spirit of not being defeated, to help oneself and gain honour, it is the Way of Strategy.

    The best use of the companion sword is in a confined space, or when you are engaged closely with an opponent. The long sword can be used effectively in all situations.

    Summer insects buzz; over new fragrant flowers; and fallen soldiers.

    Autumn trees shed leaves; skinning the tree one by one; until it is bare.

    As everything in this world is but a sham. Death is the only sincerity.

    One should not turn his back on reproof. In the words of the ancients: "Good medicine is bitter to the mouth, but has an effect on the disease. Faithful words hurt one's ears, but have value for one's conduct.

    I fall on my blade; crimson blossoms seed the earth; the spring buds drink deep.

    One should make his decisions within the space of seven breaths.

    The halberd is inferior to the spear on the battlefield. With the spear you can take the initiative, the halberd is defensive.

    When the enemy starts to collapse you must pursue him without the chance of letting go. If you fail to take advantage of your enemies collapse, they may recover.

    The arts of peace and the arts of war are like two wheels of a cart which, lacking one, will have difficulty in standing.

    The old carp is wise; he whispers his dark secrets; only the wind hears.

    My eyes grow heavy; as blackened storm clouds grow near; engulfing the sun.

    It is also said that: "The man who hunts a deer does not gaze at the mountains.

    I do not strive for my salvation with weapons but with patience and humility, in accordance with the doctrine of Jesus Christ.

    Cunning tanuki; he preys upon my humble soul; I have no defence.

    When one would make a surprise attack on the enemy, he should avoid the major roads and seek out the lesser ones. Then attack.

    Although I greet death; I do not fear its icy grip; my soul is at peace.

    From inside fortifications, the gun has no equal among weapons. It is the supreme weapon on the field before the ranks clash, but once swords are crossed the gun becomes useless.

    It is a wretched thing that the young men today are so contriving and so proud of their material possessions. Men with contriving hearts are lacking in duty. Lacking in duty, they will have no self-respect.

    Willows slowly stoop; preparing to meet the ground; as autumn arrives.

    The dark tiger stalks; my soul quivers in the air; just for a moment.

    When you cannot be deceived by men you will have realised the wisdom of strategy.

    A doll floats downstream; carrying with it prayers; spring has come at last.

    Fourthly, the way of the artisan. The way of the carpenter is to become proficient in the use of his tools, first to lay his plans with true measure and then perform his work according to plan. Thus he passes through life.

    In strategy your spiritual bearing must not be any different from normal. Both in fighting and in everyday life you should be determined though calm. Meet the situation without tenseness yet not recklessly, your spirit settled yet unbiased.

    Raindrops on the lake; a universe of ripples; centre touching all.

    When you decide to attack, keep calm and dash in quickly, forestalling the enemy. Or you can advance seemingly strongly but with a reserved spirit, forestalling him in advance.

    The people of the various provinces are strictly forbidden to have in their possession any swords, short swords, bows, spears, firearms, or other types of arms.

    When something out of the ordinary happens, it is ridiculous to say that it is a mystery or a portent of something to come….the mystery is created in (their) minds, and by waiting for disaster, it is from their very minds that it occurs.

    A samurai with no group and no horse is not a samurai at all.

    I grow old and hunch; as gnarled branches turn downwards; returning to roots.

    Sheltering cherry; my last breath stirs your blossom; my soul ascends. Meh.

    If you are slain in battle, you should be resolved to have your corpse facing the enemy.

    To die by the sword; no finer honour exists; winter’s grip awaits.

    A man whose profession is the use of arms should think and then act upon not only his fame, but also that of his descendants. He should not scandalise his name forever by holding his one and only life too dear.

    Fish break the surface; and a reflection shatters; momentarily.

    Autumn maple leaves; their colours, like the harvest; remind me of home.

    The spirit of defeating a man is the same for ten million men. The strategist makes small things into big things, like building a great Buddha from a one foot model.

    Many men feel that they should act according to the time or the moment they are facing, and thus are in confusion when something goes beyond this and some difficulty arises.

    Give my dream back raven! The moon you woke me to is misted over.

    When a flower is composed, it does not bloom all at once although the spring has come. Otherwise, yesterday's friend will become today's enemy, as yesterday's flower will become today's dust.

    Melting icicles; once proud soldiers, lose all form; returning to streams.

    The void is nothingness. By knowing things that exist, you can know that which does not exist. That is the void.

    A tree’s skeleton; exposed by autumn season; ready for new life.

    Blossom on the breeze; settles on the face of a corpse; beauty masking death.

    Everything grows cold; stillness like a frozen lake; there will be no thaw.

    As if with the nut and flower, the nut has become less than the flower...both those teaching and those learning are concerned with colouring and showing off their technique, trying to hasten the bloom of the flower.

    The person who practices an art is an artist, not a samurai, and one should have the intention of being called a samurai.

    There is one transcending level, and this is the most excellent of all. This person is aware of the endlessness of entering deeply into a certain Way and never thinks of himself as having finished.

    A cold, low whistle; accompanies my last breath; wind in sympathy.

    Take care of yourself so you can serve your master.

    Sunset seduces; each step brings me no closer; the horizon flees.

    The gaze should be large and broad. This is the twofold gaze 'Perception and Sight'. Perception is strong and sight weak.

    This life is inconsequential; I am merely concerned about your facing the evil paths in the next one.

    It is said that one should not hesitate to correct himself when he has made a mistake. If he corrects himself without the least bit of delay, his mistakes will disappear.

    The new year begins; my eyes hunger for the sight; of my last sunrise.

    Second is the way of the merchant. The wine maker obtains his ingredients and puts them to use to make his living. The way of the merchant is always to live by taking profit.

    A flash of lightning; illuminates man’s journey; then darkness returns.

    Laying in the shade; dappled sunlight warms my face; a welcome farewell.

    Snowflakes in the air; a cold wind carries them on; to my sacred home.

    A real man does not think of victory or defeat. He plunges recklessly towards an irrational death. By doing this, you will awaken from your dreams.

    When you take up a sword, you must feel intent on cutting up the enemy. As you cut an enemy you must not change your grip, and your hands must not cower.

    A samurai will use a toothpick even though he has not eaten. Inside the skin of a dog, outside the hide of a tiger.

    Be true to the thought of the moment and avoid distraction. Other than continuing to exert yourself, enter into nothing else, but go to the extent of living single thought by single thought.

    There is not a man who does not get senile by the time he reaches sixty. And when one thinks that he will not be senile, he is already so.

    A soul ship finds me; crystal waters call my name; I am dragged below.

    An affected laugh shows lack of self-respect in a man and lewdness in a woman.

    Twice I awaken; once at the first burst of spring; once in wintertime.

    The warmth of summer; an arrow floats on the breeze; bringing with it death.

    Up into the sky; I kiss the falling snowflakes; as they pass me by.

    My acts mark the land; time makes ghosts of every deed; as snow hides footprints.

    To cut and slash are two different things. Cutting, whatever form of cutting it is, is decisive, with a resolute spirit. Slashing is nothing more than touching the enemy.

    If one thinks only of winning, a sordid victory will be worse than a defeat. For the most part, it becomes a squalid defeat.

    In the Wu Tzu it says: "He who would save his life shall lose it, and he who would give up his life shall save it."

    It is carelessness to go about with one's hands inside the slits in the sides of his hakama.

    Through the autumn fields; his steed, swift as typhoon winds; the arrow, fleeter.

    If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains.

    The depths of winter; the wolf stalks his prey by night; red blood on white snow.

    With your spirit calm, attack with a feeling of constantly crushing the enemy, from first to last. The spirit is to win in the depths of the enemy.

    One must never be perfidious to his master. In the Lun Yu it says: "One should act according to the way even in times of haste. One should act according to the way even in times of danger. It says further: 'When one is serving his master, he should exert himself."

    My wake leaves little; but as ripples reach the sea; they become great waves.

    The basic meaning of etiquette is to be quick at both the beginning and end and tranquil in the middle.

    Crossing the river; takes me from the familiar; to new adventures.

    Dreaded shikome! The winter of life revealed; my soul is now free.
    Last edited by Pavelas; 05-15-2011 at 06:46 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Colonel GuardianOfBlind's Avatar
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    wow, great, I will bookmark this page now.

    Would only be better if the authors were written too.

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    Shimazu Death Haiku

    Red as autumn leaves.
    I go to my ancestors.
    Will they welcome me?

  4. #4
    Junior Member Private Pavelas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuardianOfBlind View Post
    wow, great, I will bookmark this page now.

    Would only be better if the authors were written too.
    Yes, I know, but it would be very difficult, because quotes and authors are in separate data files.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sergeant Wulf's Avatar
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    Great list! I've always liked the quotations of total war series. Your list seems to miss one of my favorites from shogun 2: Even monkeys fall from trees

  6. #6
    Junior Member Private Florin3k's Avatar
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    please give the credits to someone else, you did not hunt the Shogun quotes you copy/paste them

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    Senior Member Brigadier HeirofAlexander's Avatar
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    Very nice list, gonna be looking in here for some qoutes to qoute.

  8. #8
    Member Lance Corporal saint242's Avatar
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    The vast majority of Shogun 2's quotes are old news to me; but then, sitting on my bookshelf right next to my PC desk, I have copies of "Hagakure," Sun Tzu's "Art of War," Miyamoto Musashi's "Book of Five Rings," and a big collection of Japanese Death Poems.

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    Default Total War: Shogun 2 quotes Shogun 2 quotes

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    Total War: Shogun 2 quotes
    Shogun 2 quotes

    Truly, there is a vast amount of amazing quotes in Total War: Shogun 2.

    Considering this is the first result on a Google search of "Shogun 2 quotes," and the entire internet doesn't have record of the all loading screen quotes in this game, I am taking the liberty of registering on this site and recording all quotes once and for all. Based on this, I'm sorry for the necro post. I will include all authors, include all missing quotes, and group by author/source. Remember, in Japan(Nippon in Japanese), family(last) names come first.

    On a side note, after searching how, I received this information by: downloading the Shogun 2 Pack File Manager, using that to open (game directory)/data/data.pack, and within that file navigating to db/quotes_tables/quotes. Credit for path goes to die_humans on gaming.stackexchange. Also, the actual text that replaces the author IDs can be found in db/quotes_people_tables/quotes_people of the data.pack file.

    If you want to find a specific quote: press control+f, type one word you know is in it, and click next until you find it.

    Note: The death poems---each a Haiku---are obviously not Japanese. Translation from Japanese would change the amount of syllables. They all were originally written in English, probably by someone or some people in the game studio.

    Please let me know if I made any mistakes, such as not separating two different quotes. You can tell if there is supposed to be a separation is there is a ',' before a capitalized sentence, and the ',' should almost always be right after a '.' as well.



    Flash of steel stills me; calmness mirrors the ocean; I await the waves. -Asakura Soteki (1474 - 1555)

    The death of blossoms; is not something to grieve on; but the way of things. -Asakura Soteki (1474 - 1555)

    Even if one has learned all the sayings of the sages and saints, he should not insist on them obstinately. -Asakura Soteki (1474 - 1555)

    A general of great merit should be said to be a man who has met with at least one great defeat. -Asakura Soteki (1474 - 1555)

    A dog is not considered a good dog because he is a good barker. A man is not considered a good man because he is a good talker. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    The tongue like a sharp knife...kills without drawing blood. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    The whole secret of existence is to have no fear. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    Nothing ever exists entirely alone; everything is in relation to everything else. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    The foot feels the foot when it feels the ground. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    It is a man's own mind, not his enemy or foe, that lures him to evil ways. -Buddha (563 BC - 483 BC)

    Dishonour is like a scar on a tree, which time, instead of effacing, only helps to enlarge. -Maxim from Bushido (The Way of the Warrior)

    When a flower is composed, it does not bloom all at once although the spring has come. Otherwise, yesterday's friend will become today's enemy, as yesterday's flower will become today's dust. -Chinese Proverb

    To die by the sword; no finer honour exists; winter’s grip awaits. -Japanese Death Poem

    Autumn blossom falls; death comes to all on swift wings; the warmth of life: gone. -Japanese Death Poem

    The warmth of summer; an arrow floats on the breeze; bringing with it death. -Japanese Death Poem

    Death now my master; cold as stone upon the field; I fall like blossom. -Japanese Death Poem

    Through the autumn fields; his steed, swift as typhoon winds; the arrow, fleeter. -Japanese Death Poem

    The depths of winter; the wolf stalks his prey by night; red blood on white snow. -Japanese Death Poem

    Dreaded shikome! The winter of life revealed; my soul is now free. -Japanese Death Poem

    Wounded and beaten; go without me my brothers; I leave my body here. -Japanese Death Poem

    Winter’s first snow; bodies freeze upon the ground; remnants of battle. -Japanese Death Poem

    I die triumphant; my soul soars above the snow; released at last. -Japanese Death Poem

    Although I greet death; I do not fear its icy grip; my soul is at peace. -Japanese Death Poem

    Camellia blossom; falling swiftly to the ground; my head follows after. -Japanese Death Poem

    The crane soars higher; its wings brush cherry blossom; my soul flies with it. -Japanese Death Poem

    In the ponds cool depths; the happy frog plays in spring; his life, a slow game. -Japanese Death Poem

    Summer’s arid heat; the dry parched earth welcomes me; my blood nourishing. -Japanese Death Poem

    Mount Fuji’s great peak; shrouded in tender spring rain; the lonely crane cries. -Japanese Death Poem

    Blossom on the breeze; settles on the face of a corpse; beauty masking death. -Japanese Death Poem

    Warm summer rain; probes my glassy lifeless eyes; its warmth abandoned. -Japanese Death Poem

    Snowflakes in the air; a cold wind carries them on; to my sacred home. -Japanese Death Poem

    A doll floats downstream; carrying with it prayers; spring has come at last. -Japanese Death Poem

    Sheltering cherry; my last breath stirs your blossom; my soul ascends. Meh. -Japanese Death Poem

    Autumn maple leaves; their colours, like the harvest; remind me of home. -Japanese Death Poem

    A soul ship finds me; crystal waters call my name; I am dragged below. -Japanese Death Poem

    Cold steel pierces flesh; a moment of clarity: death is not the end. -Japanese Death Poem

    The sorrow of defeat; Too much to bear; The kind sword touches my cold flesh. -Japanese Death Poem

    Noble enemy: I mourn your loss as I mourned; for my first-born son. -Japanese Death Poem

    Shapes in the shadow; a glint of steel; the silence steals my happy life. -Japanese Death Poem

    Cunning tanuki; he preys upon my humble soul; I have no defence. -Japanese Death Poem

    The old carp is wise; he whispers his dark secrets; only the wind hears. -Japanese Death Poem

    The dark tiger stalks; my soul quivers in the air; just for a moment. -Japanese Death Poem

    With my last breath; I honour my great master; now I go to him. -Japanese Death Poem

    Now I meet my end; warm blood washes my mouth; the tide coming forth. -Japanese Death Poem

    My untimely death; plays like a noh tragedy; the masks are all wrong. -Japanese Death Poem

    Sunset seduces; each step brings me no closer; the horizon flees. -Japanese Death Poem

    A flash of lightning; illuminates man’s journey; then darkness returns. -Japanese Death Poem

    Raindrops on the lake; a universe of ripples; centre touching all. -Japanese Death Poem

    Leaves turn green to gold; not to end but to transform; as flesh rots to dust. -Japanese Death Poem

    I grow old and hunch; as gnarled branches turn downwards; returning to roots. -Japanese Death Poem

    Fish break the surface; and a reflection shatters; momentarily. -Japanese Death Poem

    My acts mark the land; time makes ghosts of every deed; as snow hides footprints. -Japanese Death Poem

    My wake leaves little; but as ripples reach the sea; they become great waves. -Japanese Death Poem

    I fall on my blade; crimson blossoms seed the earth; the spring buds drink deep. -Japanese Death Poem

    Autumn trees shed leaves; skinning the tree one by one; until it is bare. -Japanese Death Poem

    My eyes grow heavy; as blackened storm clouds grow near; engulfing the sun. -Japanese Death Poem

    Summer heat cracks dirt; weed tendrils escape and grab; dragging my bleached bones. -Japanese Death Poempoem

    Dripping morning dew; mimics the blood from a blade; it does not wake me. -Japanese Death Poem

    Melting icicles; once proud soldiers, lose all form; returning to streams. -Japanese Death Poem

    Gold arcs through the sky; as a breeze lifts fallen leaves; and I leave my dream. -Japanese Death Poem

    Everything grows cold; stillness like a frozen lake; there will be no thaw. -Japanese Death Poem

    Laying in the shade; dappled sunlight warms my face; a welcome farewell. -Japanese Death Poem

    Frost coats my body; a final suit of armour; buried in silver. -Japanese Death Poem

    Journeying westward; dried leaves crumble underfoot; blown by autumn wind. -Japanese Death Poem

    Lines etched in my face; are leafless winter branches; a map of my life. -Japanese Death Poem

    Memories fading; awakening from the dream; gone like morning dew. -Japanese Death Poem

    Covered by blossoms; I curl up to the dreaming; nature’s own blanket. -Japanese Death Poem

    Up into the sky; I kiss the falling snowflakes; as they pass me by. -Japanese Death Poem

    Twice I awaken; once at the first burst of spring; once in wintertime. -Japanese Death Poem

    Crossing the river; takes me from the familiar; to new adventures. -Japanese Death Poem

    Summer insects buzz; over new fragrant flowers; and fallen soldiers. -Japanese Death Poem

    Spring blinks and withers; sheds its skin then dons a cloak; of sunset gold. -Japanese Death Poem

    Willows slowly stoop; preparing to meet the ground; as autumn arrives. -Japanese Death Poem

    In the autumn time; you cannot catch every leaf; nor halt coming age. -Japanese Death Poem

    Heat haze of summer; obscures a man’s path ahead; an unclear future. -Japanese Death Poem

    A tree’s skeleton; exposed by autumn season; ready for new life. -Japanese Death Poem

    Spring stretches and bursts; spilling forth life – but not me; my spring was last year. -Japanese Death Poem

    A generous rain; it lands hard on eyes that; neither flinch nor blink. -Japanese Death Poem

    A cold, low whistle; accompanies my last breath; wind in sympathy. -Japanese Death Poem

    The new year begins; my eyes hunger for the sight; of my last sunrise. -Japanese Death Poem

    Turning the snow pink; in the absence of springtime; I create blossoms. -Japanese Death Poem

    A flower falls, even though we love it; and a weed grows, even though we do not love it. -dogen zenji

    When we discover that the truth is already in us, we are all at once our original selves. -dogen zenji

    The colour of the mountains is Buddha's body; the sound of running water is his great speech. -dogen zenji

    Do not think you will necessarily be aware of your own enlightenment. -dogen zenji

    One should always be genteel in his speaking. A man shows his inmost self by a single word. -hojo nagauji

    If one will fix his heart in such a way and assist the world and its people, he will have the devotion of the men who see and hear him. -hojo shigetoki

    It is truly regrettable that a person will treat a man who is valuable to him well, and a man who is worthless to him poorly. -hojo shigetoki

    One should have insight into this world of dreams that passes in the twinkling of an eye. -hojo shigetoki

    The peasant is the foundation of the state and must be governed with care. He must be allowed neither too much, nor too little, but just enough rice to live on and keep for seed in the following year. The remainder must be taken from him in tax. -honda masanobu

    A man must not live under the same sky as one who has injured his lord or father. -ieyasu constitution

    A samurai may kill a member of the lower class who has behaved offensively to him. Authorities do not require notification, the samurai being given permission to cut down (the offender) and leave without further ado. -ieyasu constitution 2

    One should not be envious of someone who has prospered by unjust deeds. Nor should he disdain someone who has fallen while adhering to the path of righteousness. -imagawa sadayo

    Just as water will conform to the shape of the vessel that contains it, so will a man follow the good and evil of his companions. -imagawa sadayo

    Without knowledge of learning, one will ultimately have no military victories. -imagawa sadayo

    A little piece of gold may be highly valued, but if it gets in one's eye, the result will be darkness. -iwamizudera monogatari

    Beginning is easy - Continuing is hard. -japanese proverb

    One kind word can warm three winter months. -japanese proverb

    The reverse side also has a reverse side. -japanese proverb

    The stake that sticks out gets hammered down. -japanese proverb

    If you do not enter the tiger's cave, you will not catch its cub. -japanese proverb

    Even monkeys fall from trees., The clever hawk hides its claws. -japanese proverb

    Having been born into the house of a warrior, one's intentions should be to grasp the long and the short swords and to die. -kato kiyomasa

    It is said that the inferior seek to emulate the superior. Thus, if a general slackens only a little, those beneath him will be greatly negligent. -kato kiyomasa

    One should not be negligent in the way of the retainer. One should rise at four in the morning, practice sword technique, eat one's meal, and train with the bow, the gun, and the horse. -kato kiyomasa

    As for the decorum at the time of a campaign, one must be mindful that he is a samurai. A person who loves beautification where it is unnecessary is fit for punishment. -kato kiyomasa

    If a man does not investigate into the matter of bushido daily, it will be difficult for him to die a brave and manly death. -kato kiyomasa

    Peasants are people without sense or forethought. Therefore, they must not give rice to their wives and children at harvest time, but must save food for the future. They should eat millet, vegetables, and other co**** food instead of rice. Even the fallen leaves of plants should be saved as food against famine. -keian no ofuregaki

    The arts of peace and the arts of war are like two wheels of a cart which, lacking one, will have difficulty in standing. -kuroda nagamasa

    Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Seek what they sought. -Matsuo Basho (1644 - 1694)

    Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home. -Matsuo Basho (1644 - 1694)

    Cutting down the enemy is the way of strategy, and there is no need for many refinements of it. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you have attained the way of strategy there will be nothing that you cannot understand. You will see the way in everything. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    As if with the nut and flower, the nut has become less than the flower...both those teaching and those learning are concerned with colouring and showing off their technique, trying to hasten the bloom of the flower. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The way of the farmer. Using agricultural instruments, he sees springs through to autumns with an eye on the changes of the season. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Second is the way of the merchant. The wine maker obtains his ingredients and puts them to use to make his living. The way of the merchant is always to live by taking profit. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Thirdly, the gentlemen warrior, carrying the weaponry of his way. The way of the warrior is to master the virtue of his weapons. If a gentlemen dislikes strategy he will not appreciate the benefit of weaponry, so must he not have a little taste for this? -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Fourthly, the way of the artisan. The way of the carpenter is to become proficient in the use of his tools, first to lay his plans with true measure and then perform his work according to plan. Thus he passes through life. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    If you want to learn the craft of war, ponder over this book. The teacher is as a needle, the disciple is as thread. You must practice constantly. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The spirit of defeating a man is the same for ten million men. The strategist makes small things into big things, like building a great Buddha from a one foot model. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you appreciate the power of nature, knowing the rhythm of any situation, you will be able to hit the enemy naturally and strike naturally. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    This is truth: When you sacrifice your life, you must make fullest use of your weaponry. It is false not to do so, and to die with a weapon as yet undrawn. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    It is not difficult to wield a sword in one hand; the Way to learn this is to train with two long swords, one in each hand. It will seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The best use of the companion sword is in a confined space, or when you are engaged closely with an opponent. The long sword can be used effectively in all situations. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The halberd is inferior to the spear on the battlefield. With the spear you can take the initiative, the halberd is defensive. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The bow is tactically strong at the commencement of battle, especially battles on a moor, as it is possible to shoot quickly among the spearmen. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    From inside fortifications, the gun has no equal among weapons. It is the supreme weapon on the field before the ranks clash, but once swords are crossed the gun becomes useless. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    You should not have a favourite weapon. To become over-familiar with one weapon is as much a fault as not knowing it sufficiently well. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Also by training you will be able to freely control your own body, conquer men with your body, and with sufficient training you will be able to beat ten men with your spirit. When you have reached this point, will it not mean that you are invincible? -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    If there is a Way involving the spirit of not being defeated, to help oneself and gain honour, it is the Way of Strategy. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Do not let your spirit be influenced by your body, or your body be influenced by your spirit. Be neither insufficiently spirited or over spirited. An elevated spirit is weak and a low spirit is weak. Do not let the enemy see your spirit. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Polish your wisdom: learn public justice, distinguish between good and evil, study the ways of different arts one by one. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you cannot be deceived by men you will have realised the wisdom of strategy. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    In strategy it is important to see distant things as if they were close and to take a distanced view of close things. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    It is necessary in strategy to be able to look to both sides without moving the eyeballs. You cannot master this ability quickly. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you take up a sword, you must feel intent on cutting up the enemy. As you cut an enemy you must not change your grip, and your hands must not cower. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    To cut and slash are two different things. Cutting, whatever form of cutting it is, is decisive, with a resolute spirit. Slashing is nothing more than touching the enemy. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    With your spirit calm, attack with a feeling of constantly crushing the enemy, from first to last. The spirit is to win in the depths of the enemy. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The important thing in strategy is to suppress the enemy's useful actions, but allow his useless actions. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    'Crossing at a ford' occurs often in a man's lifetime. It means setting sail even though your friends stay in harbour, knowing the route, knowing the soundness of your ship and the favour of the day. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When the enemy starts to collapse you must pursue him without the chance of letting go. If you fail to take advantage of your enemies collapse, they may recover. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you cannot see the enemy's position, indicate that you are about to attack strongly, to discover his resources. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    You can frighten the enemy not just by what you present to their eyes, but by shouting, making a small force seem large, or by threatening them from the flank without warning. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    What is called the spirit of the void is where there is nothing. It is not included in man's knowledge. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    People in this world look at things mistakenly, and think that what they do not understand must be the void. This is not the true void. It is bewilderment. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    In the void is virtue, and no evil. Wisdom has existence, principle has existence, the way has existence, spirit is nothingness. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The void is nothingness. By knowing things that exist, you can know that which does not exist. That is the void. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    The gaze should be large and broad. This is the twofold gaze 'Perception and Sight'. Perception is strong and sight weak. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    If we watch men of other skills discussing theory, and concentrating on techniques with the hands, even though they seem skilful to watch, they have not the slightest true spirit. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    In strategy your spiritual bearing must not be any different from normal. Both in fighting and in everyday life you should be determined though calm. Meet the situation without tenseness yet not recklessly, your spirit settled yet unbiased. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    When you decide to attack, keep calm and dash in quickly, forestalling the enemy. Or you can advance seemingly strongly but with a reserved spirit, forestalling him in advance. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    In contests of strategy it is bad to be led about by the enemy. You must always be able to lead the enemy about. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    You win battles by knowing the enemy's timing, and using a timing which the enemy does not expect. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Generally speaking, the way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    To master the virtue of the long sword is to govern the world and oneself, thus the long sword is the basis of strategy. If he attains the virtue of the long sword, one man can beat ten men. In my strategy, one man is the same as ten thousand, so this strategy is the complete warrior's craft. -Extract from The Book of Five Rings, Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

    Intelligence is the flower of discrimination. There are many examples of the flower blooming but not bearing fruit., Bushido is in being crazy to die. Fifty or more could not kill one such a man. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    Consider the minds of your underlings well, for it will be difficult to be wide of the mark when judging things in comparison from their standpoint. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    Encourage and listen well to the words of your subordinates. It is well known that gold lies hidden underground. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    No matter whether a person belongs to the upper or lower ranks, if he has not put his life on the line at least once he has cause for shame. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    The way of the samurai is found in death. When it comes to either/or, there is only the quick choice of death. It is not particularly difficult. Be determined and advance. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    Throughout your life advance daily, becoming more skilful than yesterday, more skilful than today. This is never-ending. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    Matters of great concern should be treated lightly. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    No matter if the enemy has thousands of men, there is fulfilment in simply standing them off and being determined to cut them all down, starting from one end. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    A real man does not think of victory or defeat. He plunges recklessly towards an irrational death. By doing this, you will awaken from your dreams. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    A samurai with no group and no horse is not a samurai at all. -Nabeshima Naoshige (1537 - 1619)

    A man whose profession is the use of arms should think and then act upon not only his fame, but also that of his descendants. He should not scandalise his name forever by holding his one and only life too dear. -Shiba Yoshimasa (1350 - 1410)

    Many men feel that they should act according to the time or the moment they are facing, and thus are in confusion when something goes beyond this and some difficulty arises. -Shiba Yoshimasa (1350 - 1410)

    In this world of uncertainty, ours should be a path of discipline. -Shiba Yoshimasa (1350 - 1410)

    Deliberate tactical errors and minor losses are the means by which to bait the enemy. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Bin (308 BC - 316 BC)

    On both difficult and easy terrain, you must know the 'tenable' and 'fatal' ground. Occupy tenable ground and attack on fatal ground. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Bin (308 BC - 316 BC)


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    He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The skilful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Opportunities multiply as they are seized. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    If you know your enemy and know yourself, you will not be imperilled by a hundred battles. If you do not know the others but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one. If you do not know the enemy and do not know yourselves you will be in danger in every battle. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Act after having made assessments. The one who first knows the measure of far and near wins — this is the rule of armed struggle. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    To perceive victory when it is known to all is not really skilful… It does not take much strength to lift a hair, it does not take sharp eyes to see the sun and moon, it does not take sharp ears to hear the thunderclap. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    All men can see these tactics whereby I conquer, but what none can see is the strategy out of which victory is evolved. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    All warfare is based on deception. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent's fate. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Can you imagine what I would do if I could do all I can? -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Confront them with annihilation, and they will then survive; plunge them into a deadly situation, and they will then live. When people fall into danger, they are then able to strive for victory. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    For them to perceive the advantage of defeating the enemy, they must also have their rewards. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He who is prudent, and lies in wait for an enemy who is not, will be victorious. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    He who knows when he can fight, and when he cannot, will be victorious. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Hence that general is skilful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skilful in defence whose opponent does not know what to attack. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    If our soldiers are not overburdened with money, it is not because they have a distaste for riches; if their lives are not unduly long, it is not because they are disinclined to longevity. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    If you are far from the enemy, make him believe you are near. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy's country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Invincibility lies in the defence; the possibility of victory in the attack. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    It is essential to seek out enemy agents who have come to conduct espionage against you and to bribe them to serve you. Give them instructions and care for them. Thus double agents are recruited and used. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    It is only the enlightened ruler and the wise general who will use the highest intelligence of the army for the purposes of spying, and thereby they achieve great results. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Now the reason the enlightened prince and the wise general conquer the enemy whenever they move, and their achievements surpass those of ordinary men, is foreknowledge. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Of all those in the army close to the commander none is more intimate than the secret agent; of all rewards none more liberal than those given to secret agents; of all matters none is more confidential than those relating to secret operations. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Pretend inferiority and encourage his arrogance. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Prohibit the taking of omens, and do away with superstitious doubts. Then, until death itself comes, no calamity need be feared. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Secret operations are essential in war; upon them the army relies to make its every move. -sExtract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The enlightened ruler is heedful, and the good general full of caution. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The opportunity to secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The quality of decision is like the well-timed swoop of a falcon which enables it to strike and destroy its victim. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    To fight and conquer in all our battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    To see victory only when it is within the ken of the common herd is not the acme of excellence. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    (TF2 anyone? hehe ^_^)
    If fighting is sure to result in victory, then you must fight, even though the ruler forbid it; if fighting will not result in victory, then you must not fight even at the ruler's bidding. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Where the army is, prices are high; when prices rise the wealth of the people is exhausted. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The expert in battle seeks his victory from strategic advantage and does not demand it from his men. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Being unconquerable lies with yourself; being conquerable lies with your enemy. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    One defends when his strength is inadequate, he attacks when it is abundant. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    A leader leads by example, not by force. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, the general is to blame. But if his orders are clear, and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their officers. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Bestow rewards without respect to customary practice; publish orders without respect to precedent. Thus you may employ the entire army as you would one man. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Speed is the essence of war. Take advantage of the enemy's unpreparedness; travel by unexpected routes and strike him where he has taken no precautions. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Too frequent rewards indicate that the general is at the end of his resources; too frequent punishments that he is in acute distress. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    To a surrounded enemy, you must leave a way of escape. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    Subtle and insubstantial, the expert leaves no trace; divinely mysterious, he is inaudible. Thus he is master of his enemy's fate. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The ultimate in disposing one's troops is to be without ascertainable shape. Then the most penetrating spies cannot pry in nor can the wise lay plans against you. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    The art of giving orders is not to try to rectify the minor blunders and not be swayed by petty doubts. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    When torrential water ****es boulders, it is because of its momentum. When the strike of a hawk breaks the body of its prey, it is because of timing. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease. -Extract from The Art of War, Sun Tzu (544 BC - 496 BC)

    I do not strive for my salvation with weapons but with patience and humility, in accordance with the doctrine of Jesus Christ. -Takayama Ukon (1552 - 1615)

    One's soldiers should not yell abuse at the enemy. An old saying goes: "Arouse a bee and it will come at you with the force of a dragon." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    In the Wu Tzu it says: "He who would save his life shall lose it, and he who would give up his life shall save it." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    One should not utter a word about his own inadequacies. In the Oxo it says: "When a man lets out a single word, the long and short of him will be known." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    One must not be negligent in learning. In the Lun Yu it says: "To study and not to think is darkness. To think without study is dangerous." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    One must never be perfidious to his master. In the Lun Yu it says: "One should act according to the way even in times of haste. One should act according to the way even in times of danger. It says further: 'When one is serving his master, he should exert himself." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    One should not turn his back on reproof. In the words of the ancients: "Good medicine is bitter to the mouth, but has an effect on the disease. Faithful words hurt one's ears, but have value for one's conduct." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    It is also said that: "The man who hunts a deer does not gaze at the mountains." -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    When one would make a surprise attack on the enemy, he should avoid the major roads and seek out the lesser ones. Then attack. -Takeda Nobushige (1525 - 1561)

    A man with deep far-sightedness will survey both the beginning and the end of a situation and continually consider its every facet as important. -Takeda Shingen (1521 - 1573)

    Learning is to a man as the leaves and branches are to a tree, and it can be said that he should simply not be without it. -Takeda Shingen (1521 - 1573)

    Men with discrimination will be viewed as schemers; second, men with deep far-sightedness will be seen as cowards; and third, men with rough behaviour will be mistaken for real warriors. -Takeda Shingen (1521 - 1573)

    Take care of yourself so you can serve your master. -Extract from The Tale of the Heike

    This life is inconsequential; I am merely concerned about your facing the evil paths in the next one. -Extract from The Tale of the Heike

    Death refuses to wait for the space of a breath; life is more evanescent than a mayfly or a lightning flash. -Extract from The Tale of the Heike

    Gold and silver are treasures more precious than life. A man whose wish to serve is so strong that he offers bribes for an appointment shows thereby that his intentions are loyal. -Tanuma Okitsugu (1719 - 1788)

    If thou knowest only what it is to conquer, and knowest not what it is to be defeated, woe unto thee; it will fare ill with thee. -Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543 - 1616)

    There are seven emotions: joy, anger, anxiety, adoration, grief, fear, and hate, and if a man does not give way to these he can be called patient. -Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543 - 1616)

    How can a man commit acts of martial valour if he values his life? -Torii Mototada (1539 - 1600)

    If you will take it into your mind to be sincere in throwing away your life for your master, you will not have the slightest fear or trembling even with the advent of innumerable impending calamities. -Torii Mototada (1539 - 1600)

    I will stand off the forces of the entire country here…and die a resplendent death. -Torii Mototada (1539 - 1600)

    The people of the various provinces are strictly forbidden to have in their possession any swords, short swords, bows, spears, firearms, or other types of arms. -Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536 - 1600)

    The possession of unnecessary implements makes difficult the collection of taxes and dues and tends to foment uprisings. -Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536 - 1600)

    Give my dream back raven! The moon you woke me to is misted over. -Uejima Onitsura (1660 - 1738)

    A samurai will use a toothpick even though he has not eaten. Inside the skin of a dog, outside the hide of a tiger. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    An affected laugh shows lack of self-respect in a man and lewdness in a woman, It is carelessness to go about with one's hands inside the slits in the sides of his hakama. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Tether even a roasted chicken. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Continue to spur a running horse. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    To ask when you already know is politeness. To ask when you don't know is the rule. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Go ahead and gamble a lie. A person who will not tell you seven lies within a hundred yards is useless as a man. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    As long as people overlook matters, then inferiors can, without any fear, lead an easy and peaceful life. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    When all your judgements are based on your own wisdom, you tend towards selfishness and fail by straying from the right path. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    By bringing shame to a person, how could one expect to make him a better man? -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    There is one transcending level, and this is the most excellent of all. This person is aware of the endlessness of entering deeply into a certain Way and never thinks of himself as having finished. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    In the eyes of mercy, no one should have hateful thoughts. Feel pity for the man who is even more at fault. The area and size of mercy is limitless. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    A person who is discreet in speaking will be useful during the good times and will avoid punishment during the bad. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    If you are slain in battle, you should be resolved to have your corpse facing the enemy. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    There is not a man who does not get senile by the time he reaches sixty. And when one thinks that he will not be senile, he is already so. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    If one thinks only of winning, a sordid victory will be worse than a defeat. For the most part, it becomes a squalid defeat. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    A person who knows but a little will put on an air of knowledge. This is a matter of inexperience. When someone knows something well, it will not be seen in this manner. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The basic meaning of etiquette is to be quick at both the beginning and end and tranquil in the middle. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    As everything in this world is but a sham. Death is the only sincerity. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    One should make his decisions within the space of seven breaths. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The end is important in all things. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    It is a wretched thing that the young men today are so contriving and so proud of their material possessions. Men with contriving hearts are lacking in duty. Lacking in duty, they will have no self-respect. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    When delivering something like an important letter or other written materials, grasp it firmly in your hand as you go and do not release it once, but hand it over directly to the recipient. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    By inconsistency and frivolity we stray from the Way and show ourselves to be beginners. In this we do much harm. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    It is better not to become acquainted with men about whom you have formerly had doubts. No matter what you do, they will be people by whom you will be tripped up or taken in. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The saying 'the arts aid the body' is for samurai of other regions. For samurai of the Nabeshima clan the arts bring ruin to the body. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The person who practices an art is an artist, not a samurai, and one should have the intention of being called a samurai. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    It is said that one should not hesitate to correct himself when he has made a mistake. If he corrects himself without the least bit of delay, his mistakes will disappear. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    You cannot tell whether a person is good or bad by his vicissitudes in life. Good and bad fortune are matters of fate. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    When something out of the ordinary happens, it is ridiculous to say that it is a mystery or a portent of something to come….the mystery is created in (their) minds, and by waiting for disaster, it is from their very minds that it occurs. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    A warrior should not say something fainthearted, even casually. He should set his mind to this beforehand. Even in trifling matters the depths of one's heart can be seen. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    When someone is giving you his opinion, you should receive it with deep gratitude even though it is worthless. If you don't, he will not tell you the things that he has seen and heard about you again. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    It is better to have some unhappiness while one is still young, for if a person does not experience some bitterness, his disposition will not settle down. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Be true to the thought of the moment and avoid distraction. Other than continuing to exert yourself, enter into nothing else, but go to the extent of living single thought by single thought. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    One should be wary of talking on end about such subjects as learning, morality or folklore in front of elders or people of rank. It is disagreeable to listen to. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Even if one's head were to be suddenly cut off, he should be able to do one more action with certainty. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Covetousness, anger and foolishness are things to sort out well. When bad things happen in the world, if you look at them comparatively, they are not unrelated to these three things. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    Looking comparatively at the good things, you will see that they are not excluded from wisdom, humanity and bravery. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The way of the warrior is death. This means choosing death whenever there is a choice between life and death. It means nothing else. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)

    The Four Oaths: Never be late with respect to the way of the warrior; be useful to the lord; be respectful to your parents; get beyond love and grief: exist for the good of man. -Maxim from Hagakure (In the Shadow of the Leaves), Yamamoto Tsunetomo (1659 - 1719)


    (Phew, that took awhile, enjoy ^_^)
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    (End of post 2 of 2)
    Last edited by Sunpeece; 03-09-2012 at 12:26 AM.

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