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Ultimate Araby Unit List (The Canon Edition)

24

Comments

  • NeoYasNeoYas Posts: 604Registered Users
    Thank you Some_Scribe for this great work, no doubt there is enough lore about Araby to flesh out a very interesting faction.


  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    Just for fun: An elephant lore bit that I missed in the WHFB 6th edition rulebook, pg. 173, is that the Imperial Zoo in Altdorf actually has elephants.

    The Imperial Zoo also has "giant snakes brought by Arabian merchants from the Southlands" (pg. 173). No idea what that's about or even if the Arabyans use giant snakes, since it only says they come from the Southlands, meaning that the Arabyans could've just been hired by the Zoo to capture some for them, but it's a thing and you can see it in Altdorf, so yay!

    Also, the snakes could just be the giant snakes that we have in our world, like pythons and anacondas...Oh, who am I kidding? This is Warhammer, where almost everything can kill you horribly and actual giant creatures abound. If they say "giant snakes" in Warhammer, they're probably serious about the giant part. (Plus, the Imperial Zoo actually has giant creatures in it, so if the snakes weren't giant then the author, a scholar from Nuln, would've been able to tell.)


    Unknown to most, when the Arabyans went to capture the snakes, they brought along someone with experience fighting giant serpents. Here we see the hero engaging his quarry in what's clearly a Slaaneshi temple.

    Next post will come before Saturday. We're not done yet, people!
  • CrajohCrajoh Member Posts: 1,432Registered Users
    OP thanks for posting. Cheers
    Live your life and try to do no harm.

    "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." Evelyn Beatrice Hall
  • TennisgolfbollTennisgolfboll Posts: 7,623Registered Users
    Good job
    Read all my replies as if we are having a pint and a good old time. I will always read your reply like that.
  • ArizonaBlack1ArizonaBlack1 Posts: 246Registered Users
    Dang! You make Araby sound good! Like a really neat and fun good.
  • blaatblaat Junior Member Posts: 3,042Registered Users
    thank you for the work OP was a blast to read

    snip

    It's much easier and more fun to get engrossed in lore that takes itself seriously and tries to make sense within its own frame of reference.

    the reason I prefer LOTR over warhammer fantasy and 40k

    I am dutch so if you like to have a talk in dutch shoot me a PM :)
  • TalmoreanTalmorean Posts: 1,430Registered Users
    Dude the amount of work you put into this is astounding. Well done.
  • MrJadeMrJade Senior Member Lansing, MIPosts: 7,162Registered Users

    Dang! You make Araby sound good! Like a really neat and fun good.

    That's because Araby is good.
    Thrones of Britannia: 69/100
    Warhammer II: 73/100
    Warhammer: 79/100
    Attila: 70/100 [Age of Charlemagne: 72/100]
    Rome II: 49/100
    Shogun II: 93/100 [Fall of the Samurai: 95/100]
    Napoleon: 58/100
    Empire: 53/100
    Medieval II: 90/100 [Kingdoms: 90/100]
    Rome I: 88/100
    Medieval I: 92/100
    Shogun I: 84/100
  • PatriksevePatrikseve Member Posts: 1,637Registered Users
    They should def skip enuchs and those Dervishes also not go down the Allah path. Its not to be rude to any muslims but since this faction is a very overdrive sterotype like most human factions are I think its better they follow the latter editions and just remove real world like let say for the Bretoonians they dont worship God or are christians etc. Same goes for Araby if they are included even if the inspiration for both are clear to some extent. I think they can do a well balanced and interesting 2 ll faction with some great designs (As you pointed out I do hope they skip those clone sterotype beard stuff and do something more proper for the looks and variation). besides that I think they can really have a go at it with some interesting monsters here and get some cool stuff.

    Corsairs could potentially be a cheap unit that increase raiding and they could have maybe a water raiding stance or something affiliated with treasures on the maps etc? I also hope they gain some unique gameplay mechanics as with the other factions. That all aside I think the campaign could be one of restoration and reestablish themselves in the world. In the campaign map we can clearly see that the bretoonian crusaders have taken much of the lands, the tomb kings are resurging and giving this faction maybe 1 or starting settlement could work without removing the crusader factions. Instead those can be the starting threat with Tomb Kings to follow especially Nagash servant Arkhan the black is likely a very early critical threat or maybe an early opportunity for a an agreement of peace and distraction against an Settra invasion etc. So I think they can both work, be interesting, be fun also offer some early challenge and have a very unique and instersting rooster with a potentiall fun and engaging mechanics tied to them as a dlc faction.

  • Xenos7Xenos7 Posts: 4,930Registered Users

    They should def skip enuchs and those Dervishes also not go down the Allah path. Its not to be rude to any muslims but since this faction is a very overdrive sterotype like most human factions are I think its better they follow the latter editions and just remove real world like let say for the Bretoonians they dont worship God or are christians etc. Same goes for Araby if they are included even if the inspiration for both are clear to some extent. I think they can do a well balanced and interesting 2 ll faction with some great designs (As you pointed out I do hope they skip those clone sterotype beard stuff and do something more proper for the looks and variation). besides that I think they can really have a go at it with some interesting monsters here and get some cool stuff.

    Corsairs could potentially be a cheap unit that increase raiding and they could have maybe a water raiding stance or something affiliated with treasures on the maps etc? I also hope they gain some unique gameplay mechanics as with the other factions. That all aside I think the campaign could be one of restoration and reestablish themselves in the world. In the campaign map we can clearly see that the bretoonian crusaders have taken much of the lands, the tomb kings are resurging and giving this faction maybe 1 or starting settlement could work without removing the crusader factions. Instead those can be the starting threat with Tomb Kings to follow especially Nagash servant Arkhan the black is likely a very early critical threat or maybe an early opportunity for a an agreement of peace and distraction against an Settra invasion etc. So I think they can both work, be interesting, be fun also offer some early challenge and have a very unique and instersting rooster with a potentiall fun and engaging mechanics tied to them as a dlc faction.

    I think in the latest versions of the lore the Arabyans worship Ormazd, which is kinda of a play on Ahura Mazda and a generic sun god. Eunuchs and Dervishes are great, don't see why they shouldn't be in.
  • baronblackbaronblack Posts: 3,202Registered Users
    @Some_Scribe Ehy, good fella, do you want a nasty and totally backstabbing collaboration with the allmighty me regarding Araby LLs? I want to smash the myth that Araby does not have LLs.
  • Warlord_Lu_BuWarlord_Lu_Bu Posts: 1,973Registered Users
    I kinda hope Araby looks similar to the Haradrim from Lord of the Rings... a mix of Persian and African cultures, with glittering bronze and fur armors and weapons :D but I also really want da damn guns!!!!!!
    "I am the punishment of Tengri, if you had not sinned, he would not have sent me against you." - Chenghis Khan Temujin
  • lordreaven448lordreaven448 Posts: 249Registered Users
    Very good job. I appreciate the effort you put in. A note on the Jezzails. Since the Skaven in older editions copied them, perhaps they can fill a roll similar to Great Bow Ushabti. Bonuses to large with high damage, but low rate of fire and a small unit. That way Archers still have a role in the army.
  • MrJadeMrJade Senior Member Lansing, MIPosts: 7,162Registered Users
    I just hope Araby makes it into the game.
    Thrones of Britannia: 69/100
    Warhammer II: 73/100
    Warhammer: 79/100
    Attila: 70/100 [Age of Charlemagne: 72/100]
    Rome II: 49/100
    Shogun II: 93/100 [Fall of the Samurai: 95/100]
    Napoleon: 58/100
    Empire: 53/100
    Medieval II: 90/100 [Kingdoms: 90/100]
    Rome I: 88/100
    Medieval I: 92/100
    Shogun I: 84/100
  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    So, we've covered Araby's infantry, cavalry, and monsters. So far, things have been looking pretty sweet. But what good is having a great roster if there's no one to lead it?


    "That's it! I've had it with these monkey-bitin' Bret's in my money-ridin' lands!"

    So now it's time to look at the lords and heroes who've been keeping Araby alive, if not always on the winning side (though the same can be said for EVERY race's leaders), for thousands of years. We'll also look at the mount options they have, and how they can help your characters kick all kinds of butt up and down the Southlands.

    Part 4 - Lords, Heroes, and Mounts

    Sultan


    Your average Arabyan Sultan, according to canon. I'm not joking.

    The rulers of Araby, who're generally less interested in war and more interested in...not-war.

    Yeah. According to Warmaster Armies (pg. 48), "few Sultans would be so bold as to take to the field personally". More often, they hand the job of leading their armies to a Grand Vizier.

    This lack of militancy isn't too surprising, given Sultans' usual lifestyle: In the WHFB 6th edition rulebook , our friend Hieronymous of Nuln (remember him?) writes that the Sultans " of Copher, Lashiek, and Martek live in unimaginable luxury [though not the Sultan of Al Haikk, which is weird, since he's the Great Sultan and theoretical ruler of all Araby, and they tend to avoid battle like all the others]." He goes on to say that Sultans are "served by hundreds of slaves who will fulfil their every whim, their harems are filled with voluptuous beauties from across the world and their treasure chambers with all the splendor and wealth of that distant land" (pg. 176). Geez, with a lifestyle like that, it'd be hard to get me to leave my HOUSE, let alone go lead an army.

    Of course, this is all coming from an Imperial scholar, so we should take his words with a grain of salt, but it's the best canon description we have of Sultans' lifestyles, so we're stuck with it until further notice. But yeah, it makes sense why most Sultans don't like going out on campaign when they'd have to leave all that good stuff behind.


    No GW art of Sultans, so have a pic of a real-life fighting Arab monarch. This is actually from Osprey, a military history publisher that tries to go for accuracy, so this is indeed the sort of stuff Arab soldiers would've worn in this time period.

    At least they can still be decent rulers, or at least as much as other rulers in Warhammer: While some of the Sultans are cruel and nasty, Hieronymous notes that "others are great rulers and patrons of art and science." So even in a world like Warhammer, just because you're not a fighting monarch doesn't mean you can't be a kick*** Sultan.

    Note that I said "most" Sultans don't fight. This is because, thankfully for us, Warmaters says that there have been Sultans who go out and lead their armies in person. Jaffar was one of them, and it says there have been others, and since we don't know what the current Sultans of Araby are like, it's totally possible that they could be a bit more militarily inclined than their predecessors. But more on that when we get into potential Legendary Lords.

    Grand Vizier


    By Arabyan law, anyone wishing to command an army must have a white, pointy beard and moustache since it'll match the color of their flags. No exceptions. (And that wasn't a surrender joke; go back and look at the banners the infantry and cavalry are carrying.)

    Your generic melee general, and the guys who actually lead most Arabyan armies.

    Honestly, I pretty much said everything there is to say about Grand Viziers already. He's the generic melee general. That's it. If you've played the game, you already know how to use him.

    Fun fact: In Warmaster, there was no Sultan or Grand Vizier unit. You just had a generic "General" unit to lead your armies, and the above model is for a "Commander", so it could be used as either a hero or lord.

    Next.
    Emirs & Sheiks


    No GW images, so have some Middle Eastern warriors from the time of the Crusades. The guy in the foreground is a high-ranking Seljuk lord, and would make a good Emir or Sheik.

    The generic melee hero option (sort of).

    Warmaster Armies tells us on pg. 47 that Emirs and Sheiks are the leaders of the tribes that live outside Araby's cities. As noted earlier, whether a leader is an Emir or a Sheik depends on where their tribe comes from geographically: If the leader's tribe lives in the north or west, closer to Araby's cities, he's called an Emir. If his tribe lives in the south or east, around the Great Desert and nearer the Land of the Dead, he's called a Sheik. There's no listed difference between their roles, so aside from some cultural differences, they're probably just different titles for the same position.

    Emirs in particular have been tied to Araby's Corsairs. As we covered earlier, the Corsairs of Sartosa were ruled by an Emir, and its said that the Corsairs have strong tribal loyalties that prevented the Tileans from bribing them to defect like they would with Norscans or Greenskins. This makes sense, considering that the Emirs, again, rule over tribes in the north and west, which means their tribes a) live in the more settled parts of Araby, where ships and sailing are very common, and b) the north and west are the best locations from which to launch raids on the Old World.

    Sheiks, by contrast, would probably have more ties to Araby's Desert Riders and Camels, since the southern and eastern tribes live further inland around the Great Desert. They'd probably have lighter armor than Emirs because they live further from the major centers of wealth and commerce, but they'd be more fast-moving and use bows as well as swords, just like the tribesmen they lead into battle. Perhaps they could even unlock those jezails that we see in this famous model:


    And they say only Hochland has sniper rifles. I mean, Hochland Long Rifles are almost certainly better than Arabyan jezails, but still. Also, this is the only visualization I've been able to find of an Arabyan gunpowder weapon.

    All this together means that Araby can easily have 2 melee hero options: Emirs would be more infantry-focused and give buffs to Corsairs and urban units. Sheiks, by contrast, would be cavalry-focused and give buffs to Desert Riders, Camels, and tribal units. I also think Sheiks should be melee-ranged hybrids, just like the Desert Riders and Camels.

    Of course, despite having this neat info, Warmaster just represented these guys with the generically named "Hero" (pg. 48). Way to go above and beyond, guys.

    Magicians/Sorcerers


    "I had to die my beard white to get this job!" (Seriously, GW, why did you paint every Arabyan leader to look like an old guy? And again, what's with the omnipresent pointy beards and moustaches?)

    Araby's spellcasters. Again, different sources call them Magicians and Sorcerers.

    For the sake of consistency, I'm going to continue calling them Magicians, but do note that Sorcerer is a more common name in the canon sources. I didn't actually realize that when I decided to call them Magicians, but now I know. And knowing is half the battle! A-RAB-YYYYYYYYYYYYYY! ARABY IS THERE! A-RAB-YYYYYYYYYYYYY!...


    "Your Magic Carpets have foiled COBRA's plans for the last time, Araby!"

    Er, yeah, anyway....

    Arabyan spellcasters work their magic in very different ways than all the other human races we've met in these games so far. To understand why, a brief description of magic in the Warhammer world is in order.

    You see, magic in Warhammer blows like a wind from the Realm of Chaos into the world through the fallen Warpgates at the north and south poles (hence the name Winds of Magic). Living farther north and south means you have to put up with way more Chaos-related crap, but you also can use magic in the same way as the Empire, Bretonnia, Kislev, the Elves, Tilea, and Estalia (presumably; we've never seen Estalian spellcasters to my knowledge, but they're at about the same longitude as Tileans, so wizards in Estalia shouldn't have a problem using magic conventionally).

    Araby, by contrast, lies far away from either pole. The Winds of Magic are very diffuse by the time they reach Araby, so it's much more difficult for wizards to work their spellcraft in conventional ways. That's why Arabyan Magicians DON'T work their magic in conventional ways!

    Instead of forming spells themselves, which is, again, REALLY FREAKING HARD (and, knowing Warhammer magic, probably dangerous) so far from the poles, Arabyan Magicians just say "screw it" and use their powers to control Djinn (pg. 47). (Technically, it says they control "elemental spirits of the desert, djinn, efreets, genies and such-like spirits", but I already went over how Dreadfleet made all of those just different names for Djinn, so I'm not going into it again here.)


    "Hm, I could cast Sunstrike on my own, exhausting myself and risking my life and the lives of everyone around me without any guarantee of success, or I could, you know...use a Djinn."

    Arabyan Magicians had four unique spells in Warmaster Armies (pg. 49). All of them have to do with the desert, the sun, and/or Djinns in some way:

    1. Sand Storm - A cheap spell where the Magician "commands the desert spirits [AKA Djinn] to engulf his foes in a swirling cloud of choking sand and dust." Sand Storm is an area of effect spell that affects all enemies within 30cm of the Magician. All enemies within that range suffer a -1 Command penalty, making it harder for the opponent to issue orders. To translate Sand Storm to TWW, they'd have to change it a bit since players don't have to roll dice to issue units orders. To preserve some of the spell's original use, perhaps it could prevent the units affected from receiving new orders. For example, if you want to get your spearmen into your opponent's cavalry, throw Sand Storm on the cavalry so your opponent can't order it to flee while your spearmen get into combat.

    2. Mirage - Another cheap spell, this time with a 60cm range. Essentially, the Magician creates an illusion of an Arabyan unit (any type) in the targeted spot. These fake troops can't move or fight, and they disappear if any other unit comes into contact with them, but the enemy suffers penalties from being near them as if they were a real unit. This wasn't due to Fear or anything like that; the Warmaster and WHFB rules placed limits on units that were very close to the enemy. For example, units in WHFB that were too near the enemy couldn't march (double movement) if they were too close to the enemy. These sorts of limitations aren't a thing in TWW, so instead they can have the illusion give nearby enemy units penalties to morale or something. Just say that the enemy is very surprised to see very Arabyan troops suddenly pop up out of nowhere. ("This fight has been rough, but we can still wiiiiiiiHOLY F*** WHERE THE F*** DID THOSE F***ING ELEPHANTS COME FROM OH F*** WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!")

    Mirage has no time limit, but it also has a limitation where the Magician can't cast any more spells until the illusion disappears. Honestly, I'm fine with this limitation as long as a) you can chose to end the illusion yourself at any time. I'm not sure if it should cost magic to maintain once it's in play, since locking up your Magician could be a very bit deal.

    3. Sunstrike A more expensive spell, Sunstrike is a magic missile. According to its description, "bright beams of burning energy leap from the sorcerer's eyes and scythe through all before him."

    Wait, bright burning beams from the eyes...

    Sonuvab****.


    Go ahead and gloat, Tomb Kings, but remember: Araby had laser eyes 12 years before it was cool! (Actually, in-universe, this might've been the inspiration for the Arabyans developing a laser-eye spell. I don't know if that was intentional on CA and GW's part when they designed the Heirotitan, but it's still an awesome connection between the two races.)

    Warmaster doesn't have any strength or toughness stats like WHFB, so it just says that the spell inflicts "three shooting attacks" on its target and anything else in its way. That's not a whole lot to go off of when trying to determine how powerful it is, so here's a few other Warmaster damage spells for comparison:

    -Curse of Years (Vampire Counts): 6 attacks
    -Doom Bolt (Dark Elves): 3 attacks
    -Warp Lightning (Skaven): 3 attacks
    -Foot of Gork (Greenskins): 6 attacks

    Granted, not all of these spells are magic missiles that can go through multiple units, but I think that's a pretty good comparison.

    Sunstrike can also drive unengaged (not in melee combat )units it hits back. This was a unique mechanic in Warmaster where units could be driven back (not rout, just driven back a bit) by some hits. So overall, Sunstrike is a decently damaging magic missile that can (if CA and GW decide to include this) drive enemy units back, disrupting enemy formations and battle lines. Pretty darn useful, if I do say so myself. (Though I wonder; does Sunstrike drive YOUR units back in the event of friendly fire?)

    4. Curse of the Djinn The last and most costly Arabyan spell. To cast this, the Magician targets an enemy unit up to 30cm away and "channels the immense power of the Djinn through his own body and lays a terrible curse on his foes." Just imagine taking one of these things...


    HUNDREDS OF FEET TALL

    ...and channeling it through your own body. What on earth does that feel like? How dangerous is it? More importantly, what would it LOOK like in-game?

    After all this buildup, the effect is pretty mundane, but (situationally) useful: The target unit must reroll all successful armor saves during that turn's close combat phase. If it were implemented in TWW, it would probably just decrease the target's armor.

    Oh, and remember; if the Magician has a Djinn mount, they get +1 to cast Curse of the Djinn. Yay! I don't know why they don't get +1 for their other spells, considering they're relying heavily on Djinn to cast all their spells anyway, but whatever.

    One last thought before we move on: Perhaps they could make Magicians into a hero-level wizard, and Sorcerers into a lord-level wizard. That's if they want Araby to have magical generic lords available, but considering how unique their magic is in the Warhammer world (not necessarily more powerful, but definitely unique), I wouldn't mind if they got a lord-level generic caster.

    That's it for Magicians and Arabyan magic. Moving on:

    Assassin

    Did you know that we have no records of the real-life Hashashin actually using hasish or any other drugs at all outside of anti-Assassin crusader propaganda? Talk about Flanderization!

    Exactly what it says on the tin.

    I already said everything there is to say about Assassins in the infantry post, but I'll reiterate: The Land of Assassins exists on canon maps of Araby. We don't know anything about its inhabitants, but they'd probably be based on Hashashin stereotypes, so it wouldn't be hard for CA and GW to make an Assassin hero and/or unit for Araby.

    Next.

    Thief/Prince of Theives


    Anyone who says Aladdin can't be bad*** needs to have their head dunked in a desert oasis. (Don't actually do that because their general boorishness could poison the water.)

    Like Assassins and Dervishes, Thieves are an extrapolation from the names of Arabyan locations. In this case, it's the city of Alhaka or, as it's more commonly known as, Al-haikk, which means "City of Thieves" in Arabyan. If a city's thieves are so infamous that it takes its friggin' NAME from them, especially when that city is its nation's capital, then those thieves must be pretty darn remarkable.

    As for the role a Thief hero could play, they could be a utility-centered hero; the kind who helps you out in a bunch of little ways and just makes your life a bit easier. On the campaign map, Thieves could do thief-y work, like, say, disrupting or even stealing a province's income or increasing the effectiveness of friendly agents. In an army, Thieves could provide stuff like extra security against ambushes, increased chance of getting magic items after a battle, better outcomes when scouting ruins, and more. In battles, perhaps some targeted debuffs to hit enemy characters with, making them easier for your army to kill.

    Again, though, we just don't have any lore about the thieves that gave Al-haikk its name, so all of the above was speculation and suggestions. Moving on.

    And that's pretty much it for generic lords and heroes. But what kind of lord or hero doesn't have a cool mount to prance around on? So, without further ado, let's go through Arabyan mount options!

    Arabyan Horse


    A real-life Mameluk force, and a good option for CA and GW if they wanted to give Arabyan Knights a visual update.

    The most basic mount. Like Bretonnian horses, Arabyan steeds are excellent and highly valued. They're described as being graceful and swift, and "it is popularly supposed that [they] are descended from Elven horses brought over from the west [AKA Ulthuan] many centuries ago" (Warmaster Armies, pg. 47). Perhaps Arabyan horses could move faster but give less of a charge bonus to their riders.

    Barded Arabyan Horse


    A Khurasani heavy cavalryman from the mid-7th century, so over 300 years before those Mameluks in the previous post.

    Exactly what it says on the tin. Arabyan barding shouldn't be as heavy as Old Worlder barding, given how hot their climate is.

    Camel


    The real mystery for visitors to Araby is: Which is meaner, the man or the beast?

    The hero model with a gun was riding a Camel. Therefore, Arabyan heroes (or at least Sheiks) should get Camels as mount options.

    That's all I got. Next.

    Radiant Pegasus


    No GW artwork, so I typed in "pegasus fire breath" and this is what came up. (It works even better when you realize she's intimately connected to the show's sun.)

    A Pegasus variant listed in Storm of Magic, an expansion for 8th edition WHFB on page 96, and by far the coolest type of Pegasus I've yet found in Warhammer.

    Radiant Pegasi are "most commonly found upon the sunlit plateaus of Arabyan mountains. [I told you the sources spelled Arabyan both ways!] They absorb the sun's heat, transmuting it into the burning light that flows over their skin like ripples of brightest flame." Sweet. So it's like a Pegasus, only with solar-powered fires running up and down its body.

    But wait! It gets better! "When threatened, a Radiant Pegasus can discharge this magic at its attackers in a searing and crackling flash." Don't know what that means? I'll spell it out for you:

    Radiant Pegasi have a breath weapon.

    Granted, it's only Strength 2 and it doesn't have any secondary abilities. (For comparison, in WHFB High Elf Dragons had Strength 4 breath weapons, and the Vampire Counts' Zombie Dragon had a Strength 2 breath weapon with a -3 armor save modifier) But Strength 2 is more than enough to deal big damage to low-armor, low-toughness units like Goblins, Empire State Troops, and most Elven units. As long as your opponent has some units like that in his army, the Radiant Pegasus will have a good target to roast. And considering how Radiant Pegasi cost only a small fraction of what a Dragon costs (60 points a pop, if you're curious), they're a really great way to add some serious chaff-killing power to your army.

    It's also way better than those Dark Pegasi that the Dark Elves use. +1 Strength on the turn it charges? Compared to a breath weapon? Get out of here, Morathi, go back to your son's house and leave the flying horses to the Arabyans. (It gets funnier when you realize that Radiant Pegasi only cost 5 points more than Dark Pegasi and have the same base stats.)

    Other than the breath weapon, Radiant Pegasi have the same stats as any other Pegasi. The only difference is the breath weapon.

    As for how an Arabyan could ride a firey flying horse, they can just say that the Arabyans use enchanted saddles to protect the rider from the flames.

    It's possible that Arabyans have normal Pegasi too, but I haven't found any mention of them. Besides, if you're not using a Radiant Pegasi as your mode of flight, you're probably using a...

    Magic Carpet


    Flying with your eyes closed isn't recommended by the NCAA (National Carpet Association of Araby). Each year over 5,000 deaths are caused nationwide by carpet riders not watching where they're going. Stay safe. Fly smart.

    All I have to say here is: Altough Warmaster didn't have rules for putting your characters on Magic Carpets, if you could give a non-Arabyan character a Magic Carpet in WHFB 8th edition (granted, it was a magic item), then I don't see why Arabyan characters wouldn't have it as a mount choice.

    Oh, and only use Magic Carpets for characters you want to keep out of close combat. Carpets and melee just don't mesh well.

    Elephant


    The Elephant mount model from Warmaster, plus other assorted stuff.

    An Elephant for your lords and maybe heroes to ride and squish lesser people. Also, it's nice to see that SOME races know how to make their command elephants look fittingly regal. Looks at Norsca.

    That's it for Araby's mount options, as well as its generic lords and heroes. However, before I end this post, there's something I should briefly talk about:

    Arabyan religion and the info we have for it, or rather the lack thereof.

    Continued in Part 2
  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    edited April 2018
    Part 4 continued: Arabyan Religion

    Throughout all my digging through canon sources, the only reference I've found to Arabyan religious practices is in Warmaster Armies on page 47. All it says is that Djinn "are worshipped by the superstitious people of Araby. It is commonly believed that the spirits must be appeased with prayers and small tokens of respect such as gifts of food and drink."

    That's it. That's all the canon info we have on Arabyan religious practices and beliefs.

    Even then, this is barely anything to go off of. It also doesn't preclude them worshipping other, actual gods, nor does it describe other facets of their faith.

    Now, I've been hearing talk about Ormazd, the supposed God of Araby (and former ruling god of Nehekhara) who's basically Allah from Islam with a different name. Sounds promising, but one problem; Ormazd wasn't mentioned in anything I'd read, and I've plumbed the canon sources. So I did some searching, only to find that he didn't even have an English page on any Warhammer Fantasy wiki (which are good places to get the names of sources, even if relying on the wikis alone is questionable at best).

    Then I stumbled upon this page, the only place where I found any kind of info about Ormazd:

    http://www.madalfred.com/Articles.html

    It's the webpage of a guy with lots of interesting stuff he's made...for Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 1st edition.



    That's it. Ormazd, if he ever existed outside of fan creations, is from the 1st edition WFRP...which was published in the 80s...and included things like Half-Orcs and Gnomes.



    I checked the religion section of the 1st edition WFRP rulebook just to be sure, and there's no mention of Ormazd at all. I also checked the Tome of Salvation from the RPG's second edition, and guess what? It doesn't mention Ormazd either.

    So I can't even prove whether Ormazd was ever part of the RPGs, which, even if he was, still aren't canon.

    Plus, the lore given about Ormazd from that website clashes with the current canon about Nehekhara's history and religion, so even if Ormazd WAS in a GW source, he'd still be non-canon by virtue of BEING RETCONNED!



    So much for Araby having a surprisingly deep and interesting religion in older sources.

    Seriously, I felt like I'd failed somehow. I felt like I'd followed the rainbow and found the pot of gold, only there wasn't any gold, just a note that said "April fools!" ARGH.

    But yeah. If anyone says Ormazd is canon, he isn't. I haven't found him in any GW-published stuff, I haven't found him in the non-canon RPGs, and as far as I know he's a homebrew god just intended to make your games of WFRP more interesting. (Which I'm sure he does a great job of, and there's obviously been a lot of thought put into him and his backstory, but that doesn't help me.)

    So Araby's religion is really a blank slate right now. On one hand, this is annoying for lore nerds like me. On the other hand, GW and CA could do something interesting with Araby's religion.

    If it were up to me, Araby's cities would follow a faith that's a blend of Islam, Zoroastrianism (FIRE TEMPLES, BABY!), and old Arabic paganism. The tribes out in the Great Desert would follow the same faith, but lean more heavily towards the pagan aspects maybe even revere the Djinn as a nod to the Warmaster lore. Something like that would fit in nicely with the rest of the world, where the Empire basically follows a blend of Norse paganism and Catholicism.

    But it's not up to me. And I hope that if we do get Araby, GW takes the chance to flesh out their religion more, because I refuse to believe that any race in a world like Warhammer with very active and obvious gods wouldn't have a religion.

    Anyway, that's it for tonight. Tune in for Part V, where I'll talk briefly about Arabyan artillery and then go into their possible Legendary Lords. We're almost done, folks!


    Post edited by Some_Scribe on
  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    Sorry folks! I had to cut Part 4 in two because it went over the character limit. But it's up before Saturday as promised, so that's good. I will now celebrate by having dinner, because I'm hungry!

    Part 5 will be up by the next Friday for sure. I'll try to get it done this weekend, but I can't promise anything.

    Toodles!
  • ArizonaBlack1ArizonaBlack1 Posts: 246Registered Users

    Sorry folks! I had to cut Part 4 in two because it went over the character limit. But it's up before Saturday as promised, so that's good. I will now celebrate by having dinner, because I'm hungry!

    Part 5 will be up by the next Friday for sure. I'll try to get it done this weekend, but I can't promise anything.

    Toodles!

    You’re a great writer, thanks for the interesting thread! Keep it up
  • DraxynnicDraxynnic Posts: 5,650Registered Users
    As an observation, earlier editions had a lot of magic missile spells that basically boiled down to "shooting beams of energy from your eyes". Shem's Burning Gaze is one example that persisted, although disappointingly the in-game animation is a projectile rather than shooting a beam of energy from the caster's eyes.
  • baronblackbaronblack Posts: 3,202Registered Users

    Sorry folks! I had to cut Part 4 in two because it went over the character limit. But it's up before Saturday as promised, so that's good. I will now celebrate by having dinner, because I'm hungry!

    Part 5 will be up by the next Friday for sure. I'll try to get it done this weekend, but I can't promise anything.

    Toodles!

    Ehy, @Some_Scribe, the Sandstorm spell is already on Total War Warhammer 2.
    Khatep in fact, use it's own version. But it's quite strange, since it is an unknown lore of magic and the skill is set on a brownish colour. It's like they put it before Araby itself, but since it's unknown lore of magic, we do not even know to what lore it belongs. However, the effect from Warmaster are wildly different since it's an Attack Spell.
  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users

    Sorry folks! I had to cut Part 4 in two because it went over the character limit. But it's up before Saturday as promised, so that's good. I will now celebrate by having dinner, because I'm hungry!

    Part 5 will be up by the next Friday for sure. I'll try to get it done this weekend, but I can't promise anything.

    Toodles!

    Ehy, @Some_Scribe, the Sandstorm spell is already on Total War Warhammer 2.
    Khatep in fact, use it's own version. But it's quite strange, since it is an unknown lore of magic and the skill is set on a brownish colour. It's like they put it before Araby itself, but since it's unknown lore of magic, we do not even know to what lore it belongs. However, the effect from Warmaster are wildly different since it's an Attack Spell.
    If it functions completely differently, then I'd say it ISN'T in TWW!

    Also, Araby should sue Khatep for stealing their spell names and not properly crediting them. Copyright infringement is a very serious crime in Warhammer, and the oldest continuously alive human in the setting should know that.
  • NazredNazred Senior Member Posts: 916Registered Users
  • Some_ScribeSome_Scribe Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    Quick heads up, guys.

    So, I'm already thinking ahead to the next race/subfaction I'm going to cover. It'll definitely be a shorter topic than Araby, which is fine by me.

    I've narrowed it down to three choices. I'll do whichever gets the most requests. If there aren't any requests I'll just pick one myself.

    1. Middenland
    2. Vampire Coast
    3. Estalia
  • MrJadeMrJade Senior Member Lansing, MIPosts: 7,162Registered Users
    Middenland, then Estalia, and no interest in the Coast.
    Thrones of Britannia: 69/100
    Warhammer II: 73/100
    Warhammer: 79/100
    Attila: 70/100 [Age of Charlemagne: 72/100]
    Rome II: 49/100
    Shogun II: 93/100 [Fall of the Samurai: 95/100]
    Napoleon: 58/100
    Empire: 53/100
    Medieval II: 90/100 [Kingdoms: 90/100]
    Rome I: 88/100
    Medieval I: 92/100
    Shogun I: 84/100
  • blaatblaat Junior Member Posts: 3,042Registered Users
    middenland please

    snip

    It's much easier and more fun to get engrossed in lore that takes itself seriously and tries to make sense within its own frame of reference.

    the reason I prefer LOTR over warhammer fantasy and 40k

    I am dutch so if you like to have a talk in dutch shoot me a PM :)
  • WyvaxWyvax Posts: 1,876Registered Users
    Vampire Coast, Middenland then Estalia please.
    Tomes read: The Great Betrayal, Master of Dragons, Curse of the Phoenix Crown, Trollslayer, Skavenslayer, Daemonslayer, Dragonslayer, Beastslayer, Vampireslayer

    It's T. rex, not T-Rex, you filthy casuals.
  • SakuraHeinzSakuraHeinz Junior Member Posts: 2,131Registered Users
  • MaidrosMaidros Posts: 165Registered Users
    Estalia of course
  • DraxynnicDraxynnic Posts: 5,650Registered Users
    I'm curious about Estalia myself, but mostly because that's one I don't know a lot about, while I'm reasonably familiar with what the other two bring to the proverbial table.

    (That, and I really think Middenland should be a "okay, there are a couple of special units you can build from Middenheim landmark buildings as Empire" rather than a separate list.)
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