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Thoughts on Genghis Khan?

Vlad DraculaVlad Dracula Posts: 35Registered Users
I done my research.....read books.....watch documentaries.....

I am sorry to say I am not really impressed with his "Achievements" people hyped this man to be like Alexander the Great and I can say I can't see it at all.....His most impressive feat in all his history was uniting the Mongol tribes which is surely impressive but......the "He conquered all of this and that." or "He conquered 22% of the world." is nonsense to hype him up in my view because by the time he died his children literally did the conquering and his tactics?were used YEARS before him! and he just used them effectively and the combat? he faced people who underestimated him and he faced people who were practical "Farmers"......I even read he couldn't even properly siege down an empire.....that people both mercenaries and soldiers went over to his side and betrayed their people......sounds like he had nothing but pure luck and outright better troops.

So what is everyone's thoughts on Genghis Khan?
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Comments

  • dge1dge1 Moderator Arkansas, USAPosts: 18,764Registered Users, Moderators, Knights
    Accomplishments speak volumes. From what I've been able to read/enjoy/learn about the great Khan is that he united a people, established a military that was able to conqueor a large portion of the known world during his time, and passed on the knowledge known to and from those conqueored. Merciless to those that opposed, merciful to those that acceded to his coming/rule. Though the laws within the empire were very strict, they were also the most open for that time.

    Sounds like he was a better than average general that knew how to win where different tactics were called for, then knew how to use those victories won on the battlefield.

    He has my vote for dictator of the year. :)
    "The two most common things in the universe are Hydrogen and Stupidity." - Harlan Ellison
    "The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously." - Hubert H. Humphrey
    "Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” - George Carlin
  • cool_ladcool_lad Senior Member IndiaPosts: 2,272Registered Users
    His greatest skill perhaps was finding and recruiting the right people to lead his armies. He was willing to look past personal differences to select the best leaders for his armies.

    Plus, his military organisation was quite efficient, especially when considering his enemies (whose feudal armies were couldn't match the mongol army in discipline, organisation or leadership).

    Fun period for a game, if done right. They'll really need to rework the horde mechanic for it to be effective though.
  • PocmanPocman Posts: 2,382Registered Users



    That's the mongol empire when he died.


    To put things in perspective, the mongol empire was the second largest one ever (after the British). And most of it was conquered during his time.

    Nit only that, he fought and won against very diverse armies: from the mongol horse archers of the enemy tribes, to the chinese regular armies, to the turk armies. That means learning different military doctrines, being able to use very varied military tactics...

    He sounds like a badass. That, plus he is said to be the grand grand grand grand [...] grand father of like 1/4 of the world.
  • TheWittyWatermelomTheWittyWatermelom Member Posts: 130Registered Users
    He was one of the most evil men in history. A man who butchered and brought misery to millions of people.
  • greycatgreycat Senior Member Posts: 2,366Registered Users
    He became a god.

    In Mongolian shamanism, Genghis Khan is considered one of the embodiments, if not the main embodiment, of the Tenger, the highest of the tngri (gods).
  • TheWittyWatermelomTheWittyWatermelom Member Posts: 130Registered Users
    greycat said:

    He became a god.

    In Mongolian shamanism, Genghis Khan is considered one of the embodiments, if not the main embodiment, of the Tenger, the highest of the tngri (gods).

    Now their false god is dead.

    Humans. Worshipping each other instead of the one true God who Prophets like Abraham, Moses, Jesus and Mohammed (peace be upon them all) told us about.

  • SiWISiWI Senior Member Posts: 10,381Registered Users


    you are welcome.
    Ratling_Guns.gif?t=1554385892
  • greycatgreycat Senior Member Posts: 2,366Registered Users
    edited January 2018
    I did not mean to start a theological discussion. I meant he was/is loved in his place of origin like Vlad the Impaler is. :)
  • IstvanIstvan Senior Member London, CanadaPosts: 1,233Registered Users
    edited January 2018
    I think Genghis Khan is one of those few who can actually be said to have made history by his own two hands, and not just because he was born onto the throne of a massive empire that was destined to make history regardless. Without Genghis Khan, it's hard to see the Mongols uniting and conquering much of Asia.

    I like to annoy friends and family members with my theory on history, which is that 'great' men/women generally aren't the movers that cause things to happen.

    Usually there are forces that combine to create a wave that sometimes one person happens to just catch and surf, having their name etched into history forever, even though that individual just happened to be at the right place at the right time, and therefore could basically have been replaced by any other person and it would still result in a similar outcome.

    Countries like China, England and France became prosperous, for example, less due to them having incredibly competent monarchs, and more just because their advantageous geographical positions meant that their success was a forgone conclusion, unless they'd been consistently ruled by below average rulers that caused massive fragmentation and internal strife. In general, they could therefore afford to have merely average rulers and the odd incompetent one without significant setbacks for much of their history.

    There are exceptions, however. There are instances where the forces that are needed to be combined to create a wave that would create a notable historical event and/or a powerful country are so disparate that on their own they would never combine on their own, and they genuinely require an individual to actually be that one in a million who has the skill and insight to grab the reins and steer the forces into place to create that wave that alters history. Genghis Khan is one of those. Without him, the trajectory of history would actually be altered. I don't think you can say the same about X forgettable American president or Y forgettable Chinese emperor.
    Battle not with Canadians, lest ye become a Canadian, and if ye gaze into the maple syrup, the maple syrup gazes also into you.
  • dge1dge1 Moderator Arkansas, USAPosts: 18,764Registered Users, Moderators, Knights
    Let's not get off track here.

    While religious discussions can be shut down if contravining Forum Terms & Conditions this is not a religious discussion but a historical one. The factors behind the growth and success/failure of the subject is certainly a part of the discussion. That would include the various factors contributing to the success or failure of said subject of conversation. The religion of that faction could certainly be a part of those comments.

    Take it easy. :)
    "The two most common things in the universe are Hydrogen and Stupidity." - Harlan Ellison
    "The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously." - Hubert H. Humphrey
    "Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” - George Carlin
  • BMNOBLE981BMNOBLE981 Senior Member Posts: 1,208Registered Users
    Genghis Khan, had to build his forces from scratch and went on to conquer one of the largest empires in history and your not impressed by his Achievements?



    When Temujin was 9, his father took him to live with the family of his future bride, Borte. On the return trip home, Yesukhei encountered members of the rival Tatar tribe, who invited him to a conciliatory meal, where he was poisoned for past transgressions against the Tatars. Upon hearing of his father's death, Temujin returned home to claim his position as clan chief. However, the clan refused to recognize the young boy's leadership and ostracized his family of younger brothers and half-brothers to near-refugee status. The pressure on the family was great, and in a dispute over the spoils of a hunting expedition, Temujin quarreled with and killed his half-brother, Bekhter, confirming his position as head of the family.

    read the rest below:

    https://www.biography.com/people/genghis-khan-9308634


    Dr Zoidberg "We fight over matters of honour, and whether or not abbreviations count in scrabble. THEY DON'T"

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  • TheWittyWatermelomTheWittyWatermelom Member Posts: 130Registered Users
    greycat said:

    I did not mean to start a theological discussion. I meant he was/is loved in his place of origin like Vlad the Impaler is. :)

    Yea I understood you. I was just making a general point about those people, etc. Not pointed towards you :smiley:
  • Rath_DarkbladeRath_Darkblade Senior Member Posts: 2,125Registered Users
    edited January 2018
    I think that one thing that hasn't been mentioned yet about Genghis Khan is one of the most remarkable things about a medieval society: religious tolerance. Everyone was welcome in Genghis Khan's Mongolia, regardless of race, religion or creed, so long as they were prepared to work hard and contribute to society. He didn't think that he knew best; he learned from other peoples and other societies, and recruited them to join his army or help in other ways.

    Now, show me one (just one) medieval monarch of the same era that was prepared to do the same... :wink:
    "There is nothing wrong with nepotism, provided you keep it all in the family."
    --Winston Churchill
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