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Need help with decypher some data (network)

TylzenTylzen Senior MemberDenmarkPosts: 1,148Registered Users
edited January 2011 in Technology
DSL Up 10235 kbps / 1023 kbps is my speed.

I got these readings while my connection was dropping on and off.

noise margin upstream: 12 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 12 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 0 db
output power downstream: 0 db
attenuation upstream: 0 db

noise margin upstream: 8 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 7 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 12 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 11 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db

noise margin upstream: 6 db
output power downstream: 21 db
attenuation upstream: 16 db
Post edited by Tylzen on

Comments

  • AlJabberwockAlJabberwock Moderator USAPosts: 7,729Moderators, Tech Moderators, Knights
    edited January 2011
    I'm not a network guy, and I only know enough to get my own stuff networked (which is all Cable). For real chump-stumping I have a guy who's a wizz. Here is a quote I dragged from an ADSL board that he suggested when I asked.

    Noise Margin (AKA Signal to Noise Margin or Signal to Noise Ratio)
    Relative strength of the DSL signal to Noise ratio. The higher the number the better for this measurement. In some instances interleaving can help raise the noise margin to an acceptable level.

    6dB or below is bad and will experience no synch or intermittent synch problems
    7dB-10dB is fair but does not leave much room for variances in conditions
    11dB-20dB is good with little or no synch problems* (but see note below)
    20dB-28dB is excellent
    29dB or above is outstanding

    * Note that there may be short term bursts of noise that may drop the margin, but due to the sampling time of the management utility in your modem, will not show up in the figures.

    Line Attenuation
    Measure of how much the signal has degraded between the DSLAM and the modem. This is largely a function of the distance from the exchange. The lower the dB the better for this measurement.

    20dB and below is outstanding
    20dB-30dB is excellent
    30dB-40dB is very good
    40dB-50dB is good
    50dB-60dB is poor and may experience connectivity issues
    60dB or above is bad and will experience connectivity issues

    DSL Rate ***/tx/rx/Rate
    The actual service data rate that your ISP has provisioned.

    Attainable Line Rate
    This is the maximum rate at which your modem can connect to the DSLAM if there was no service provisioning limiting the bandwidth. The higher the number the better.

    Occupancy
    Occupancy is the percentage of line capacity used. Each DSL line is capable of a certain maximum speed or "capacity" dependant on line distance and other varying factors. The occupancy is an expression of your current sync rate setting over your maximum capacity. There are occupancy rates for both upload and download. The lower the figure, the better. Because of error correction and other factors in the DSL protocols, a margin is required so that a connection can be maintained under varying line conditions. If the occupancy approaches 100%, any interference can cause the ADSL sync to be lost. A useful measurement to monitor when sync problems occur. [AFAIK the billion SNMP utility does not give a direct measurement of occupancy :-( ]

    and
    Noise Margin (AKA Signal to Noise Margin or Signal to Noise Ratio)
    Relative strength of the DSL signal to Noise ratio. 6dB is the lowest dB manufactures specify for modem to be able to synch. In some instances interleaving can help raise the noise margin to an acceptable level. The higher the number the better for this measurement.
    6dB or below is bad and will experience no synch or intermittent synch problems
    7dB-10dB is fair but does not leave much room for variances in conditions
    11dB-20dB is good with no synch problems
    20dB-28dB is excellent
    29dB or above is outstanding

    Line Attenuation
    Measure of how much the signal has degraded between the DSLAM and the modem. Maximum signal loss recommendation is usually about 60dB. The lower the dB the better for this measurement.
    20dB and below is outstanding
    20dB-30dB is excellent
    30dB-40dB is very good
    40dB-50dB is good
    50dB-60dB is poor and may experience connectivity issues
    60dB or above is bad and will experience connectivity issues

    Output Power
    How much power modem (upstream) or DSLAM (downstream) is using. Maximum recommended is about 15dB. The lower the power the better for this measurement.

    Like I said, this is not really my area, but I hope that helps. Usually when someone asks me, I just point to the descriptions.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    For most general problems, for which you have no idea of the culprit, your first port of call should be:
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  • lordmaximus77lordmaximus77 Technical Moderator Leeuwarden, NLPosts: 3,337Registered Users, Moderators, Tech Moderators, Knights
    edited January 2011
    Your phone seems to be close to the DSLAM (aka the end of the copper line). But after seeing those varying noise margins its looks like there might be "noise" or interference on your line.

    Is your splitter OK? You could even try it without the splitter
    Are there other devices connected to your phoneline? If so disconnect them one by one and see if that solves the problem.
    What the length of the cord between the modem and the point where the phone line enters your house? It's best to keep that as short as possible.
    Any fool can make things bigger and more complex. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage – to move in the opposite direction. — Albert Einstein

    viri non urinat in ventum — Anonymous Roman

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  • TylzenTylzen Senior Member DenmarkPosts: 1,148Registered Users
    edited January 2011
    I do not have a splitter.

    My router/modem is the only thing connected.
    All other connections in my apartment has been disconnected by a technician to see if that helped.
    The lenght between the modem and phone is as short as possible, they are right next to each other and cable wise as short as possible.
  • lordmaximus77lordmaximus77 Technical Moderator Leeuwarden, NLPosts: 3,337Registered Users, Moderators, Tech Moderators, Knights
    edited January 2011
    What's the make & model of your modem/router?

    Did you check the internet for "know issues" with your/modem router?

    Did you contact your ISP about the issue?
    Any fool can make things bigger and more complex. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage – to move in the opposite direction. — Albert Einstein

    viri non urinat in ventum — Anonymous Roman

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  • TylzenTylzen Senior Member DenmarkPosts: 1,148Registered Users
    edited January 2011
    ZyXEL P-2602HWL-D1A
    I checked the net.

    I have been in contact with my ISP for 9 months about this issue.
    It is my third brand of modem/router and I have had technicians out to do a direct measuring of my line at my location.

    The latest they have done now, is stopping my router from sending information to my ISP, which they said had in some few cases made the router lose the IP for a few seconds, but enough for it to keep rebooting the connecting trying to retrieve a new IP.
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